Home GK Famous wild life sancturies in Keralam,India and World

Famous wild life sancturies in Keralam,India and World

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List of Wild Life Sancturies in Kerala as well as India

Through this article I familiarize you to the wild life sanctuaries including national parks, forest reserves, bird sanctuaries, Tiger Reserves, Elephant Reserves of the of Keralam and, India. And also includes important places and suitable season to visit this places for different purposes.such as trecking jogging etc.and also given accommodation nearby and lot more(.E)

Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary

Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary is a unique protected area.It is  located in the rain shadow region in the eastern slope of Western Ghats, adjoining Tamilnadu. The area is diverse in eco systems and rich in ethnic cultural heritage. Chinnar wildlife sanctuary represents wide and large  varieties of animals(Flora and Fonna) and plants unavoidable for the proper existence of ecosystem. It is one of the best preserve wildlife sanctuaries by government as well as local people. It is actually the beautiful and valuable properties of Keralam.As the name indicates it has its own beauty in the name itself.When we hear the word Chinnar ,some pleasant thoughts flashing through the minds,particularly for the  eco-friendly people. This beautiful wildlife sanctuary is situated in the rain shadow area of Western Ghats of the state of Kerala. It has dry throne forests as well as has array of habitat like dry thorny forest, deciduous forests, shoals, grassland and riparian types because of rainfall and significant variation in altitude. This wildlife sanctuary is full of hillocks, cliffs, rocks, plains and home to various forms of micro and macro organisms.It is one of the  beautiful and best place to be visited by natural lovers.If any is not visited this place, actually a great lose to them.It is actually a great natural treat for the tourists.Large number of tourists are continually visiting this sanctuaries throughout the years.

Chinnar wildlife sanctuary is situated at 18 Km from Marayoor.Marayoor is in the districts Idukki.You know Marayoor is famous for sandalwoods. It has an area of  more than 90 Sq Km . This wild life sanctuary  got status of national wildlife sanctuary in the year 1984 from the government of India. There is an Interpretation Centre at Karimutty, two eco shops, one each at Chinnar check post and Aalampetty, an amenity centre, inspection bunglow, dormitory and cafeteria/at Chinnar check post to cater to the needs of visitors.Remeber once in your life surely visit this magnificent attractive tourists spots of Keralam.(E)

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Eravikulam National Park

 

The most magnificent and wonderful tourists spot is Eravikulam National Parks.The most sought after destination in Munnar is the Eravikulam National Park.This national park is the place where the endangered Nilgiri Thar is protected.This is the first of its kind in Keralam.  It is  Spread over 97 sq. km. This park holds the largest viable population of Tahr, several other species of rare and endangered animals, birds and butterflies can be seen.This place is the offer of nature .This park offers a magnificent view of the tea plantations and also of the rolling hills caressed by blankets of mist. The park becomes a hot destination when the hill slopes get covered in a carpet of blue. This sanctuaries is famous for the  flowering of Neelakurinji. Anamudi Peak located inside the Eravikulam National Park., It is the highest peak in south India standing at a height of 2695m. Entry of tourists is restricted but the view can be enjoyed from a distance at Rajamala. Rajamala is one of the tourism zone of Eravikulam National Park and is a place where one can see Nilgiri Tahr.The tourism zone will be closed during Feb – March every year. Visitors can get assured sighting of Nilgiri Tahr, feel the kurinji and experience the shola grassland ecosystem.Natuaral lovers can be best experienced beauty of Kurinji.(E)

Kumarakom Bird Sanctuary (Vembanad Bird Sanctuary)

Kumarakom Bird Sanctuary  is situated at Kumarakom in Kottayam district in Kerala,.Another name of it is  Vembanad Bird Sanctuary.It lies in the  banks of Vembanad Lake. Large number of migratory birds can be seen in this  sanctuary It was developed in a rubber plantation as a bird sanctuary by an Englishman.Long ago  the sanctuary was  known as Baker’s Estate. Now this  bird sanctuary is managed by Kerala Tourism Development Corporation. The sanctuary is spread over 14 acres (5.7 ha) on the southern bank of the Kavanar River.There is a system of paths for moving around within the sanctuary. Beyond the sanctuary, one can take a boat ride in Vembanad Lake or along the Kavanar River. Kumarakom is 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) from Kottayam. State Highway No. 1 leads to Kochi and Thiruvanthapuram in opposite directions. Kochi International Airport at Nedumbassery is 106 km (66 mi) from Kumarakom. Neighbouring areas such as Kaipuzha Muttu, Pathirmanal, Narakathara, Thollairam Kayal, and Poothanpandi Kayal are also good locations for spotting birds.This bird sanctuary gives special beauty to the district Kottayam.This sanctuary plays an important role to get a significant place in the tourist map for the districts Kottayam.(E)

 

Peppara Wildlife Sanctuary

 

This sanctuary lies in the capital city of Keralam,that is in Thiruvananthapuram.Lying on the outskirts of the capital city, the Peppara Wildlife Sanctuary is spread over an area of 53 sq. km. on the Western Ghats and this sanctuary was established in 1938. This sanctuary is fascinating for its dam site, thick forest areas, crystal clear streams and rocky terrains .And it is also ideal for adventure expeditions.

The sanctuary has a rich population of mammalian fauna and is emerging as a big attraction to wildlife enthusiasts and ornithologists.It is actually the paradise for environmentalists. Asian elephant, sambar, leopard, lion-tailed macaque, can be seen here. Birdlife includes the endemics like Malabar Grey Hornbill, White bellied Treepie, Small Sun bird, etc. Peppara Wildlife Sanctuary constitutes the catchments of the Peppara Dam on the Karamana River near Thiruvananthapuram, India.

The Peppara Dam was commissioned in 1983. And its main purpose is to provide  drinking water supply to Thiruvananthapuram city and suburban areas. Considering the ecological significance of the area, it was declared a sanctuary in 1983. The area was formerly a part of the Paruthippally range of the Thiruvananthapuram Territorial Division. Forests consist of part of the Palode reserve (24 square kilometres (9.3 sq mi)) and part of Kottoor reserve (29 square kilometres (11 sq mi)). The total water spread of the reservoir is 5.82 square kilometres (2.25 sq mi). The Peppara Wildlife Sanctuary is situated on Thiruvanthapuram-Ponmudi Road, about 50 km northeast of Thiruvananthapuram. Forest types include West coast tropical evergreen, Southern hilltop tropical evergreen, West coast semi-evergreen, Southern moist mixed deciduous forest, Myristica swamp forest, sub-montane hill valley swamp forest etc. The sanctuary has a rich population of mammalian fauna and is emerging as a big attraction to wildlife enthusiasts and ornithologists. 43 species of mammals, 233 species of birds, 46 species of reptiles, 13 species of amphibians and 27 species of fishes are reported from the sanctuary.

To get the detailed info of the place, best season & time to visit, how to get there, safari details / boating/ trekking details, list of animals/birds you can expect to see there , entry/camera fees, and of course all of the accommodations nearby, please download the app or send us an inquiry:

 

 

Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary (Periyar Tiger Reserve, Periyar National Park, Thekkady Wildlife Sanctuary)

 

Periyar Tiger Reserve, Thekkady, is an example of nature’s bounty, with great scenic charm, rich bio diversity and providing veritable visitor satisfaction. Sprawled over an area of 925 Sq .km., Periyar is one of the 27 tiger reserves in India. Zealously guarded and efficiently managed reserve is a repository of rare, endemic and endangered flora and fauna and forms the major watershed of two important rivers of Kerala, the Periyar and Pamba. People oriented and park centered community based ecotourism is the hallmark of Periyar Tiger Reserve.

These programmes are conducted by local people responsible for the surveillance of the vulnerable parts of the reserve. By taking tourists along, they are involved in the conservation of the forests of Periyar and some valuable revenue is generated for community welfare. People who once made a living by illegal operations in the forests have since become forest protectors and earn their livelihood through these programmes. Hence, as a visitor, when you join them in any of these programmes,you are directly contributing towards forest conservation and community welfare. Set high in the ranges of the Western Ghats, in God’s Own Country, Kerala, is the Periyar National Park and Tiger Reserve. Periyar wildlife sanctuary has a picturesque lake at the heart of the sanctuary.

Formed with the building of a dam in 1895, this reservoir meanders around the contours of the wooded hills, providing a permanent source of water for the local wildlife. Though its a Tiger Reserve, tourists come here to view the Indian elephants in the act of ablution and playfulness by the Periyar lake. BTW please note eriyar Tiger Reserve is divided into two division viz. Periyar East and Periyar West. Periyar East is made up of Thekkady, Periyar and Vallakkadavu ranges, while Periyar West division comprises Azhutha and Pampa ranges. All tourism activities at PTR take place at Thekkady, in Thekkady range.

 

Silent Valley National Park

 

Silent Valley National Park is a national park with a core zone of 237.54 square kilometres (91 sq mi) (making it the largest national park in Kerala). It is located in the Nilgiri Hills, within the Palakkad District of Kerala, South India. This region was explored in 1847 by the botanist Robert Wight, and is a setting for the epic Mahabharatha. This park is one of the last undisturbed tracts of South Western Ghats mountain rain forests and tropical moist evergreen forest in India. Contiguous with the proposed Karimpuzha National Park (225 km2) to the north and Mukurthi National Park (78.46 km2) to the north-east, it is the core of the Nilgiri International Biosphere Reserve (1,455.4 km2), and is part of The Nilgiri Sub-Cluster (6,000+ km2), Western Ghats World Heritage Site, recognised by UNESCO in 2007.

The Silent Valley region is locally known as “Sairandhrivanam”, which in Malayalam means Sairandhri’s Forest. Sairandhri is Draupadi, the wife of the Pandavas in the epic Mahabharatha, who disguised herself as Sairandhri, the maid of a queen named Sudeshna, while her family was in exile.[4] The Pandavas, deprived of their kingdom, set out on a 13-year exile. They wandered south, into what is now Kerala, until one day they came upon a magical valley where rolling grasslands met wooded ravines, a deep green river bubbled its course through impenetrable forest, where at dawn and twilight the tiger and elephant would drink together at the water’s edge, where all was harmonious and man unknown. Beside that river, in a cave on a hill slope, the Pandavas halted.

The first Western investigation of the watersheds of the Silent Valley area was in 1857 by the botanist Robert Wight.The British named the area Silent Valley because of a perceived absence of noisy cicadas. Another story attributes the name to the anglicisation of Sairandhri. A third story, refers to the presence there of many lion-tailed macaques Macaca silenus. In 1914 the forest of the Silent Valley area was declared a reserve forest, however, from 1927 to 1976 portions of the Silent Valley forest area were subjected to forestry operations.

 

Thattekkad Bird Sanctuary (Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary)

 

The Thattekkad Bird Sanctuary, covering an area of barely 25 km2, and located about 12 km from Kothamangalam (Kerala state, India), was the first bird sanctuary in Kerala. Salim Ali, one of the best known ornithologist described this sanctuary as the richest bird habitat on peninsular India. Thattekkad literally means flat forest, and the region is an evergreen low-land forest located between the branches of Periyar River, the longest river in Kerala. The Thattekkad Bird Sanctuary has a rich and varied birdlife. Several species of birds, both forest birds as well as the water birds, visit the sanctuaries. Thattekkad is made up of tropical evergreen and deciduous forests and some grassland patches. This globally acclaimed bird sanctuary owes much of its fame to Dr. Salim Ali, the internationally renowned ornithologist. After his famous bird survey of Travancore in the early 1930s, he reported that this area is extremely rich in bird diversity and that it should be made into a bird sanctuary. Thus his efforts were instrumental in the formation of this sanctuary to a large extent. More than 300 species of birds are found here.

Spread across 25 sq. km. the sanctuary lies between the tributaries of the River Periyar like a peninsula. Birds like Srilankan Frogmouth, Racket tailed Drongo, Bronzed Drongo, White bellied Treepie, Shama, Yellow-browed Bulbul, Rufous Babbler, Malabar Parakeet, Whitebellied Blue Flycatcher, Malabar Grey Hornbill, are some of the birds that can be easily seen here. Thattekkad also has extensive plantations of teak, rosewood, mahogany. The dense forest is also home to nearly 28 species of mammals and about 9 species of reptiles.

 

Tholpetty Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary

 

Tholpetty (& Muthunga) forests in the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary are the foremost and targeted tourism destinations in Wayanad District. Muthanga and Tholpetty are the two ecotourism centers in Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary. Visits to these ecotourism centers provide unforgettable wilderness experience, frequent sightings of free ranging wildlife like herds of elephants, guars, deers, monkeys, tigers, leopards, bears, many species of reptiles, fishes, butterflies, birds including vultures etc, valuable nature education information from interpretation centres etc Medicinal plants’ garden, Birth Star Plants’ (Zodiac Plants) Garden, Muthanga Elephant Camp with 3 tuskers and one female calf, traditional tribal folk lore etc are other attractions in Muthanga.

Ecotourism in Muthanga and Tholpetty is much helpful in creating deep conservation awareness in the minds of visitors. It is much educative and recreational too. It is a main source of livelihood income for local tribes including tourist guides. Ecotourism in these two centers are managed by Muthanga and Tholpetty Eco-Development Committees (EDCs) under supervision of Kerala forest department. Tholpetty sanctuary is located 20 km east of Mananthavady, 13 km from Thirunelly on the Kodagu Road.

To get the detailed info of the place, best season & time to visit, how to get there, safari details / boating/ trekking details, list of animals/birds you can expect to see there , entry/camera fees, and of course all of the accommodations nearby, please download the app or send us an inquiry:

 

 

 

 

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Muthanga Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary

Established in 1973, Muthanga Wildlife sanctuary is contiguous to the protected area network of Nagarhole and Bandipur of Karnataka on the northeast and Mudumalai of Tamil Nadu on the southeast. Rich in bio-diversity, the sanctuary is an integral part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. The management lays emphasis on scientific conservation with due consideration for the general lifestyle of the tribals and others who live in and around the forest region.

The Sanctuary has a large population of pachyderms and has been declared a Project Elephant site. Muthanga and Tholpetty forests in the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary are the foremost and targeted tourism destinations in Wayanad District. Muthanga and Tholpetty are the two ecotourism centers in Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary. Visits to these ecotourism centers provide unforgettable wilderness experience, frequent sightings of free ranging wildlife like herds of elephants, guars, deers, monkeys, tigers, leopards, bears, many species of reptiles, fishes, butterflies, birds including vultures etc, valuable nature education information from interpretation centres etc Medicinal plants’ garden, Birth Star Plants’ (Zodiac Plants) Garden, Muthanga Elephant Camp with 3 tuskers and one female calf, traditional tribal folk lore etc are other attractions in Muthanga.

Ecotourism in Muthanga and Tholpetty is much helpful in creating deep conservation awareness in the minds of visitors. It is much educative and recreational too. It is a main source of livelihood income for local tribes including tourist guides. Ecotourism in these two centers are managed by Muthanga and Tholpetty Eco-Development Committees (EDCs) under supervision of Kerala forest department. Muthunga sanctuary is located 13 km from Sultan Bathery Kerala.

 

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Begur Wayanad Forest Reserve

Located in Western Ghats, Begur Wildlife Sanctuary is among the lesser known sanctuaries in the country. Situated 30 km from Mananthawady in Wayanad district of Kerala, Begur Wildlife Sanctuary is home to a wide variety of exotic flora and fauna. Surrounded by mist-clad Western Ghats, the dense green cover and thriving wildlife population is a pleasure to nature lovers and wildlife enthusiasts. The green cover mainly comprises of deciduous forest and west coast semi evergreen forest.

The sanctuary is a treat for wildlife enthusiasts and photographers as one can spot bear, bison, civet cat, elephants, jungle cat, monkeys, panther, spotted deer, wild boar, wild dog, etc. Due to scarcity of water in the neighbouring sanctuaries like Bandipur, Nagarhole and Mudamalai, Begur wildlife sanctuary attracts large number of animals and birds during December-May. Along with Bandipur-Madhumalai-Nagarhole-Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary, Begur houses a few hundred tigers. The forests are spread across three states — Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

Sightings of black bulbul, jungle fowl, kingfisher, laughing thrush, peafowl, myna, woodpecker, etc. are common in the park. Flora varieties include teak, eucalyptus, rosewood, vengal, etc.

 

Mangalavanam Bird Sanctuary

Mangalavanam Bird Sanctuary. Mangalavanam is an ecologically sensitive area situated at the centre of the Indian city of Kochi. It is situated behind the Kerala High Court building. It is a nesting ground for a large variety of migratory birds and supports many types of mangroves. The Managalavanam is often regarded as the “green lung of Kochi”, considering its role in keeping the city’s air pollution under check. The area is a roosting place for many kinds of resident and migratory birds. Mangalavanam is primarily a bird refuge.

A bird survey conducted in May 2006 found that there were 194 birds belonging to 32 species. The total number of bird species recorded so far from the area is 72.      An incredible green spot with an extensive variety of life and that too amid a buzzing metro! Not ready to believe? Then visit Mangalavanam Bird Sanctuary, an ecologically sensitive area situated at the centre of Kochi behind the Kerala High Court building fittingly dubbed as the ‘green lung of Kochi’. Primarily a bird refuge, the innate appeal of Mangalavanam is augmented by the Arabian Sea which borders the sanctuary and adds to it a panoramic ambiance.

Mangalavanam, a nesting ground for a large variety of migratory birds, is a paradise for birdwatchers and twitchers. This green paradise is also a roosting place for resident as well as migratory birds. A survey conducted in 2006 revealed that there were 194 birds belonging to 32 species, in Mangalavanam.

Thickly imbedded with a variety of trees and plants, including teak, the sanctuary enjoys a cool temperature. Mangalavanam also supports many types of mangroves. Amid the thick greenery of Mangalavanam cascades a shallow tidal lake bordered with thick mangrove vegetation. The lake is connected to the Cochin backwaters by a canal. And down under the silent depth of this water lives seven species of fishes Anabas testudineus, Striped panchax, Orange chromide, Etroplus suratensis, Malabar swamp eel, Blackline rasbora and Sarotherodon. In the fresh air of Mangalavanam flies 17 species of butterflies, the little beauties that bedeck the sanctuary with multitudes of hues. The best time to visit the sanctuary are the early summer months, especially from mid-January to early-March.

Chimmini Wildlife Sanctuary (Chimmony Wildlife Sanctuary)

 

The dense tropical forests of Chimmini, shelter diverse flora and fauna. The dam across the Chimmini river offers a breathtaking view. This picturesque picnic spot is a favorite haunt of the local people. Located in the Mukundapuram Taluk of Thrissur district, Chimmini is only a tow-hour drive from Kochi. The Chimmini Wildlife Sanctuary which was established in 1984, lies contiguous with the Peechi – Vazhani sanctuary. The sanctuary is endowed with scenic beauty beyond compare. Living here in joyful abandon are elephants, sambars, gaurs, Malabar squirrels, sloth bears etc.

Chimmony wildlife sanctuary located in the Western Ghats, is one of the world’s 25 bio-diversity hot-spots, the haven of innumerable species of endangered plants and animals. (Mammals 39 Species, Birds 160 Species, Reptiles – 25, Amphibians – 14 & Fish – 31). The total area of this wild life sanctuary considered as a global mega-diversity zone comprising several local species of living organisms and virgin forests come to around 85.067 sq km inclusive of the Chimmeney Lake.

Set up in 1984, this sanctuary forms part of the Mukundapuram Taluk of Thrissur District’. The distance is 60 km from the Kochi International Airport and 36 km from Thrissur town. It comes under the Peechi Wild Life Division. The forest department organises trekking and bamboo rafting programmes in and around the sanctuary. But the best of all experiences is the Moonlight Sonata, which involves rafting on full moon lights.

To get the detailed info of the place, best season & time to visit, how to get there, safari details / boating/ trekking details, list of animals/birds you can expect to see there , entry/camera fees, and of course all of the accommodations nearby, please download the app or send us an inquiry:

 

Peechi-Vaazhaani Wildlife Sanctuary

Peechi vazhani wildlife sanctuary is the second oldest wildlife sanctuary of the state of the Kerala. This sanctuary is situated in Thrissur district of the state of the Kerala. It comprises of parts of Bahranipacha mala, Paravattanimala and Machadmala regions. This sanctuary was established in the year of 1958. It includes the forests of Nellivampathi and Palapilli with area of Chimmony wildlife sanctuary. The sanctuary covers total area of 125 Sq. Km.

The sanctuary is blessed with evergreen forests because this region witnesses near about 3000 mm rainfall in monsoon. The highest peak of the sanctuary is Ponmudi with an elevation of 923 m and it is best for trekking activities. Numerous streams flow through the sanctuary and provide ample water for wildlife habitats. The sanctuary has different types of forests like tropical semi-evergreen forests, tropical evergreen forests and moist deciduous forests. These forests support for harmonious ecosystem.

The sanctuary is home for more than 39 species of animals, 30 species of reptiles, 176 species of birds, 40 species of fish and 17 species of amphibians. The common animals like tiger, sloth bear, leopard, sambar, elephant, bonnet macaque, slender loirs and Niligiri langur found in rich numbers. Tourists can also spot other mammals like deers, barking deers, elk, bison, fox, spotted deer and many more. The sanctuary is also home for native as well as migratory birds. It is also heaven for snake lover because they can spot more than 10 species of snake here. Peechi dam is popular picnic spot because of beautiful botanical garden, rippling fountains and boating facility. The surrounding of dam is cover by lush green forest and offers breathtaking view to visitors. Tourists can take cruise ride to see the beauty of forests.

The sanctuary is a wonderful location of trekking and for a nature walk. Nature camps are held frequently in the sanctuary. Tourists have to take prior permission for trekking from the forest department.

Chenthuruni Wildlife Sanctuary (Shenduruny Wildlife Sanctuary)

 

The Shenduruney forest – declared a wildlife sanctuary in 1984 gets its name from an endemic species of tree called Chenkurunji (Gluta travancorica). In the central region of this moist, mixed deciduous forest, spread over hilly terrain of over 100 sq km, is the 26 sq km artificial lake formed by the Parappara dam built across the Shenduruney and Kulathupuzha rivers.

Presence of wild populations of lion-tailed macaque, a highly endangered species. Presence of other wild animals like elephant, tiger, leopard, bear, Nilgiri langur, Malabar giant squirrel etc. High degrees in diversity of avi-faunal wealth – 267 species of birds were reported including migratory, endemic and endangered species. An artificial lake of nearly 18.69Sq.km within the sanctuary attracts a large number of water birds.

Tropical evergreen and semi evergreen forest cover a major area of the sanctuary. It has a presence of lion-tailed macaque, a highly endangered species. A brood of the highly elusive nocturnal forest bird, the Great Eared Nightjar was spotted for the first time at Shendurney Wildlife Sanctuary in Kollam, Kerala. Earlier, it was recorded from the Siruvani foothills in Tamil Nadu in May 1995. The first eco-tourism project in India, Thenmala Eco-tourism Project has been formulated in and around Shenduruney Wildlife Sanctuary.

 

Idukki Wildlife Sanctuary

 

A repository of some of the rarest medicinal herbs, the Neyyar Dam located about 32 km from Thiruvananthapuram, is a popular picnic spot with a lake and a picturesque dam site. The lake formed by the dam across the Neyyar River is the bluest of blue, making boating irresistible for tourists.The Wildlife Sanctuary of which the dam is a part is the habitat of over a hundred species of fauna including Asian Elephant, Tiger, Leopard, Slender Loris and reptiles like King Cobra, Travancore Tortoise, etc. A crocodile breeding centre and a lion safari park are also located in the dam site.

 

Neyyar Wildlife Sanctuary

 

The Neyyar Wildlife Sanctuary in the southern state of Kerala in India is spread over the southeast corner of the Western Ghats, and covers a total area of 128 km2 (49 sq mi). Although it was declared as a sanctuary in 1958, not much was done about wildlife conservation, until 1985, when a separate wildlife wing was set up and as a result, conservation efforts have gathered momentum. A repository of some of the rarest medicinal herbs, the Neyyar Dam located about 32 km from Thiruvananthapuram, is a popular picnic spot with a lake and a picturesque dam site. The lake formed by the dam across the Neyyar River is the bluest of blue, making boating irresistible for tourists.

The Neyyar Wildlife Sanctuary of which the dam is a part is the habitat of over a hundred species of fauna including Asian Elephant, Tiger, Leopard, Slender Loris and reptiles like King Cobra, Travancore Tortoise, etc. A crocodile breeding centre and a lion safari park are also located in the dam site. There are 39 species of mammals, including Tiger, Leopard, Sloth bear, Elephant, Sambar, Barking deer, Bonnet macaque, Nilgiri Langur and Nilgiri tahr. 176 species of birds, 30 species of reptiles, 17 species of amphibians and 40 species of fishes are reported from the sanctuary

Parambikulam Wildlife Sanctuary

 

Parambikulam Tiger Reserve is a well protected ecological portion in the Nelliampathy – Anamalai landscape of the Southern Western Ghats in India. It is located in the Palakkad District of Kerala. It is one of the biodiversity hot spot in the world supports diverse habitat types and endemism. Considering its biological richness, abundance of wildlife and landscape beauty makes Parambikulam Tiger Reserve is one of the most attractive places in the entire stretch of Western Ghats. It was declared as Tiger Reserve during 2009 with total area of 643.66 Sq. Km, which includes core area of 390.89 and 252.77 Sq Km Buffer area.

Parambikulam Tiger Reserve is the most protected ecological piece of Anamalai sub unit of Western Ghats, surrounded on all sides by protected areas and sanctuaries of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, the sanctuary is endowed with a peninsular flora and fauna which are excellently conserved due to total protection and minimal human interferences. The sanctuary being a major ecological continuum from Peechhi to Eravikulam through Anamalai aids the large viable populations of wildlife. It is the home ground for different races of indigenous people who are as well an integral part of the prevailing harmonious ecosystem. The thick, opulent habitat of the sanctuary with ample water supply’s make it an abode for wildlife and there by for tourist who can have treasured memories of animal sightings and that of being in the lap of mother nature. It is popularly revered as ‘Nature’s own abode’.

To get the detailed info of the place, best season & time to visit, how to get there, safari details / boating/ trekking details, list of animals/birds you can expect to see there , entry/camera fees, and of course all of the accommodations nearby, please download the app or send us an inquiry:

 

Aralam Wildlife Sanctuary

 

The Aralam Wildlife Sanctuary is spread over 55 sq km of undulating forested highlands on the slopes of the Western Ghats. The highest peak here – Katti Betta – rises to a majestic 1145 m above sea level. Covered with tropical and semi evergreen forests, the Aralam Sanctuary is home to a vast variety of flora and fauna endemic to the Western Ghats. Elephant, gaur, sambar, spotted deer, barking deer, Nilgiri langur, Hanuman langur, Malabar giant squirrel, etc can be seen here.

Aralam, a village in Thalassery, Kannur, is also noted for the Central State Farm, a 3060 hectare farm started in 1971 by the Government of India. This is one of the main production centres of hybrid coconut seeds in the country. Aralam Wildlife Sanctuary is the northernmost wildlife sanctuary of Kerala, southwest India. A mere 55 km2 (21 sq mi) in area and located on the western slope of the Western Ghats. It was established in 1984. The headquarters of the sanctuary is near Iritty.

Aralam wildlife sanctuary is the northernmost protected area of Kerala state, situated in the southeast part of Kannur District. The sanctuary area falls in Aralam, Kelakam and Kottiyoor revenue villages and is located in the Northwest slopes of Western Ghats contiguous with the forests of Coorg (Kodagu) district of Karnataka state. It was formed by carving out areas from the Odanthode Malavaram of Thalassery special division which was an erstwhile private forest, subsequently taken over by Govt. as per the provisions of the Kerala Private Forests (Vesting and assignment) Act 1971 and from the Kottiyoor RF of Wayanad Forest Division. The Vested Forest portion of the sanctuary is 32.64 km2 and the 22.36 km2 is part of Kottiyoor RF (Reserved Forest).

 

 

 

Kurinjimala Sanctuary

 

Kurinjimala Sanctuary protects the approximately 32 km² core habitat of the endangered Neelakurinji plant in Kottakamboor and Vattavada villages in Devakulam Taluk, Idukki district of Kerala State. The sanctuary is home to threatened species of elephant, Gaur, Nilgiri tahr and deer. The new sanctuary is contiguous to the Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary to the northwest, Manjampatti Valley in Amaravati reserve forest of Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary to the northeast, Eravikulam National Park and Anamudi Shola National Park to the west, Pampadum Shola National Park to the south and the proposed Palani Hills National Park to the east.

The sanctuary provides continuity and connectivity to these five protected areas. The declaration of the sanctuary was made by the Kerala Forest Minister Benoy Viswam at the Neelakurinji Fest at Munnar on October 7, 2006. The Kurinjimala Sanctuary is habitat for diversity of many rare species of flora and fauna. The name of the sanctuary is derived from the word Kurinjimala, which means the mountain of Kurinji flowers.The Kurinjimala Sanctuary is famous for the Neelakurinji Plantation. Neelakurinji a blue flower that grows in abundance in the Idduki and Munnar region

 

Karimpuzha National Park (New Amarambalam Wildlife Sanctuary)

 

Karimpuzha National Park is a 230 km² proposed National Park located in the Nilgiri Hills, Palakkad district and Nilgiris district, Kerala and Tamil Nadu, in South India. Along with Mukhurti National Park and Karimpuzha National Park, Silent Valley National Park forms the core of Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve. This park is explored in 1847 by Robert Wight, the park remains one of the last uninterrupted territories of south Western Ghats montane rainforests and tropical moist evergreen forests in the country.

This national park has over 858 species of fauna that includes 34 species of animals and about 500 species of butterflies and moths. It is also an excellent location for birdwatchers as the park is home to over 292 species of birds that include Nilgiri wood pigeon, blue winged parakeet, grey headed bulbul, white bellied blue flycatcher, broad tailed grass wabler, Nilgiri pipit, etc. The state is taking care to make these national parks as great place to view animals and natural beauties and other botanical species. The lion tailed macaque is the most popular attraction in Silent Valley National Park. Nilgiri langur, mouse deer, gaur, fishing cat, stripe necked mongoose, panther, etc. are some of the other exotic wildlife species found in the park.

 

Mathikettan Shola National Park

Mathikettan Shola National Park is a 12.82 km² national park in Poopara village of Udumbanchola taluk in Idukki district of Kerala state, South India.It notified area national park in November 2008.The name Mathikettan derives from the Tamil word literally meaning ‘mind confuser’, as the local people say that one forgets the path once he enters into the park.It notified as a national park to protect the wildlife and rich biodiversity of the area.The shola forest in the area is bestowed with unit with geological founal and floral and geomorphological wealth.

The Mathikettan Shola National Park attracts large numbers of adventure seekers with its trails that run through the forests providing amazing views of the region. Watching birds and wildlife in their natural habitat is a popular attraction among trekkers in the national park. A haven for wildlife photographers, they visit the national park and stay for long periods to capture the animals in their natural habitat. The forest is home to beautiful and rare animals like tigers, panthers, wild elephants, giant grizzled squirrel, flying squirrels, spotted deer and Nilgiri tahrs. The park abounds in snakes such asking cobras, pythons, vipers and rat snakes, turtles, crocodiles and lizards. Make sure you wear the appropriate clothing and footwear to safeguard yourself from bites of any kind.

To get the detailed info of the place, best season & time to visit, how to get there, safari details / boating/ trekking details, list of animals/birds you can expect to see there , entry/camera fees, and of course all of the accommodations nearby, please download the app or send us an inquiry:

 

Anamudi Shola National Park

 

Anamudi Shola National Park is a protected area located along the Western Ghats in Idukki District, Kerala state, South India. It is composed of Mannavan shola, Idivara shola and Pullardi shola, covering a total area of around 7.5 km². Draft notification of this new park was released on Nov 21, 2003. The park is administered by the Kerala Department of Forests and Wildlife, Munnar Wildlife Division, together with the nearby Mathikettan Shola National Park, Eravikulam National Park, Pambadum Shola National Park, Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary and the Kurinjimala Sanctuary.

Anamudi Shola National Park provides valuable wildlife habitat connectivity between Mathikettan Shola National Park, Eravikulam National Park, Pambadum Shola National Park, Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary and the Kurinjimala Sanctuary, all of which surround this protected area. This national park forms part of the Anamalai sub-cluster, which was recently nominated for consideration for World Heritage Site status under UNESCO’s World Heritage Programme.

It is located very close to the Munnar hill station (40 km). The National Park is accessible from Kochi (160 km) and Coimbatore (150 km). The nearest railway station is at Aluva (150 km) in Kerala and Pollachi (100 km) in Tamil Nadu. The nearest town is at Munnar. 62 species of trees, 174 species of herbs and shrubs and 39 species of climbers are recorded from here. Among fauna, 100 species of butterflies and 232 species of moths belonging to 36 different families are recorded from here. 76 species of birds are also recorded from here. Tiger, Elephant, Gaur, Leopard, Sambar deer, Wild boar, Nilgiri langur and Giant squirrel are the common mammals seen here.

 

 

Pambadum Shola National Park

Pampadum Shola National Park is the smallest national park in Kerala state, South India. The park is administered by the Kerala Department of Forests and Wildlife, Munnar Wildlife Division, together with the nearby Mathikettan Shola National Park, Eravikulam National Park, Anamudi Shola National Park, Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary and the Kurinjimala Sanctuary. The park adjoins the Allinagaram Reserved Forest within the proposed Palani Hills Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park.

The name´”Pampadum Shola” means, “the forest where the snake dances”, derived from three Tamil words, “paamp”, which means “snake”; “aattam”, means “dance”; and “cholai”, means “forest”. “Shola” may be considered as a mis-speller of “cholai”. The keystone species here is the highly elusive and endangered, endemic small carnivore – the Nilgiri marten. Leopards and Indian wild dogs are sometimes sighted at dusk or dawn, tigers are an important animal of the park. The Old Kodaikanal–Munnar Road nearby is closed due to the growing population of wildlife such as elephants, buffaloes gaur and Nilgiri langurs. Some notable birds found here include the Nilgiri wood-pigeon, white-bellied shortwing, vernal hanging parrot, blue rock-thrush, blue-capped rock-thrush and Nilgiri flycatcher, and black-and-orange flycatchers. 35 km away from the Munnar town in Idukki district, another prominent hill station in Kerala the Pambadum Shola is located in the eastern part of Southern Western Ghats of Kerala on the way to Vattavada. The region with its captivating beauty is fast becoming a favourite eco-tourism destination in Kerala. The green meadows, clear blue sky, clean air and the thick foliage are something irresistible for any tourist. Eco-tourism activities here are organized jointly by the Department of Forest and Eco-development Committees comprising members of the local tribal communities. This guarantees an authentic, secure and intimate experience of wilderness to the visitors.

 

 

 

Ranipuram Wildlife Sanctuary

 

Ranipuram Wildlife sanctuary is an accumulation of grassy hills, a bio-diversity hotspot near Panathady town and lies on the Kerala-Karnataka border. Ranipuram was previously known as Madathumala. The wildlife sanctuary is linked to Kanhangad by Kanhangad-Panathur state highway. The proposed wildlife sanctuary of Kanhangad consists of an assortment of flora and fauna that are common only to the Western Ghats. This biodiversity hotspot still remains unexplored completely and there is a lot to study around it. It merges with the Talacauvery wildlife sanctuary of Karnataka. Ranipuram hill station falls in Panathady reserve and is the only spot in the district were we can find the Shola forest. Sholas are patches of stunted evergreen tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forest found in valleys amid rolling grassland in the higher mountain regions of south India.

The Ranipuram wildlife sanctuary is home to different species of animals including the elephants, leopards, deer, wild dogs, wild boars, macaques, jungle cats, leopard cats slender loris, porcupines, malabar giant squirrels, malabar civet cat, many species of birds, rare butterflies and medicinal plants. Ranipuram (ooty of kerala) is a hill station located with in Kasargod district. Kottancheri-Talacavery mountain range. It is located about 48 kilometres east of Kanhangad between the Panathur and Malom towns. by road ranipuram is accessible from Panathady at kanhangad-panathur state highway.Other trekking paths through dens forest are available from panathur,maruthom and Malom which needs permission from forest officers. There are two trekking routes available through the South Western Ghats moist deciduous forests. Part of the way the climb is assisted by cut steps. The ambiance of the forest trail is remarkable and once you reach the “Mani” (grass covered hilltop) the view is superb. The undulating cloud-topped hills stretch up to the plains and ocean on the horizon. This is unexplored territory for the nature enthusiast and birdwatcher.

 

 

Attappadi Reserve Forest

 

Attappadi Reserve Forest is a protected area comprising 249 km² of land covering the westernmost part of the 745 km² Attappadi block of Mannarghat Taluk in Palakkad district of Kerala, south India. Attappadi is an extensive mountain valley at the headwaters of the Bhavani River nestled below the Nilgiri Hills of the Western Ghats. It is bordered to the east by Coimbatore district in Tamil Nadu, on the north by the Nilgiris, south by the Palghat taluk and on the west by Karimba-I and II, Pottassery-I and II, and Mannarghat revenue villages of Mannarghat taluk of the Palghat District and Ernad taluk of the Malappuram district.

The 249 km² Attappadi Reserve Forest is an informal buffer zone bordering the Silent Valley National Park to the West. 81 km² of this forest was separated to become most of the new 94 km² Bhavani Forest Range which is part of the 147.22 km² Silent Valley Buffer Zone formally approved by the Kerala Cabinet on 6 June 2007. The elevation of Attappati valley ranges from 750 meters (2,460 ft) to the Malleswaram peak which rises to 1,664 meters (5,459 ft) from the center of the valley. The Bhavani River flows from the Northwest around the mountain in a tight bend past Attappadi village and continues to the Southeast.

 

Kadalundi Bird Sanctuary

 

The Kadalundi Bird Sanctuary lies in the Malappuram District of the state of Kerala in India. It spreads over a cluster of islands where the Kadalundipuzha River flows into the Arabian Sea. The Sanctuary hill is around 200 m above sea level. It is 19 km from Kozhikode city centre. The nearest airport is Karipur International Airport, Kozhikode. Over a hundred species of native birds have been recorded in the sanctuary, including about 60 species of migratory birds which visit seasonally; these include terns, gulls, herons, sandpipers and cormorants. Notable species are whimbrels and brahminy kites.

The sanctuary is well known for a wide variety of fish, mussels and crabs. Kadalundi Bird Sanctuary provides shelter and ideal conditions to a number of migratory birds. These birds include Terns, Gulls, Herons, Sandpipers and Cormorants, which arrive on this sanctuary in the month of November and return to their respective regions by the end of April. Some other important bird species in the sanctuary are Whimbrels and Brahminy Kites.

Apart from birds, there is considerable population of different varieties of fish, mussels and crabs in the sanctuary. The sight of thousands of colorful birds flocking to a region of 2 sq. km offer a rare and captivating moment for the visitors. There are boat facilities available for tourists to enjoy the breathtaking beauty of the lush green plantation and bird population of this sanctuary. These boats provides a great way to see turtles found here. The best season to visit this sanctuary is from December to April, since it is the season for migratory birds to stay in this wildlife sanctuary.

 

  INDIA

 

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Exploring the beauty of wildlife sanctuaries in India has its own appeal. Whether the beasts or other beings of the jungles, watching them at their natural habitats has always been a delightful as well as speculating experience.

Wildlife sanctuaries in India have been extremely successful in conserving the wildlife of India. They are the ideal place to witness the imposing beauty of the forests and their endless range of wildlife.

Here is a list of some of the best national parks and wildlife sanctuaries in India:

  1. Corbett National Park, Uttarakhand

Among all the national parks in India, the Corbett National Park is the oldest and one of the best among the top 10 national parks in India. It was established in 1936 to protect the imposing Bengal Tigers. Located at the foothills of the Himalayan range of Uttarakhand, Corbett National Park is one of the hot spots of the wildlife lovers.

 

This park has been named after the popular wildlife story writer Jim Corbett. Beauty and wilderness of this park attracts enthusiasts from various parts of the globe. This wildlife tourist destination of India has also been featured in many wildlife documentaries in order to raise the awareness towards the mighty and stunning Bengal Tigers.

  1. Kaziranga National Park, Assam

Kaziranga National Park is the only natural habitat of the endangered One-Horned Rhinos in India as well as in the world. Located in the Golaghat district of Assam, Kaziranga National Park is one of the largest wildlife sanctuaries toexplore the wildlife of Northeast India. It is also a highly visited park among the top 10 national parks in India.

This park also boasts of its number of tigers and other wildlife species. Due to the noteworthy number of tigers, Kaziranga National Park has been declared as Tiger Reserve Forest in 2006. Other wildlife consists Elephants, Wild Buffaloes and Swamp Deer. The park also witnesses a large number of migratory birds during the winters.

  1. 3. Bandipur National Park, Karnataka

 

 

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The Bandipur National Park is the most popular among all the national parks in South India. It is a natural home to Elephants and several other endangered species. Lush forest of the Deccan Plateau and the Western Ghats makes this park one of the beautiful parks  in India.  The park is located 80 km away from Mysore and almost 215 km away from Bangalore.

 

  1. 4. Bandhavgarh National Park, Madhya Pradesh

 

The Bandhavgarh National Park is another enticing name in the list of national parks of India. Located in the Umaria district of Madhya Pradesh, it is one of the largest national parks of Madhya Pradesh. Declared as a national park in 1968, this park has a noteworthy number of Tigers in India.

 

This park also has a significant number of Leopards and Deer. Among all the attractions of Bandhavgarh National Park, White Tigers are the most spectacular.

  1. Kanha National Park, Madhya Pradesh

 

Kanha National Park is another sought after destination in the list of national parks of Madhya Pradesh. Established in the year 1955, this park has gained a lot of attention due to its efforts in saving the rare and almost extinct species of the Swamp Deer, also known as ‘Barasingha’. It is also one of the well-maintained parks in Asia.

 

The other feature of the Kanha National Park is its sunset point called Bamni Dadar. Almost the entire park can be seen from this point. It offers the most eye-catching views of the animals in their natural habitat.

  1. 6. Gir National Park and Sasan Gir Sanctuary, Gujarat

 

The Gir National Park and the Sasan Gir Sanctuary of Gujarat are the only wildlife sanctuaries in India that have Asiatic Lions. October-June is the ideal time to visit the place and watch these majestic beasts strolling in their territories.

 

The park was established on 18th September 1965 and it is one of the largest and elegantly preserved areas for the Asiatic Lions. Rivers and streams flowing through this national park remain occupied by the dwellers of the park.

  1. Keoladeo Ghana National Park – Bharatpur, Rajasthan

 

Keoladeo Ghana National Park is one of the man-made wetlands in India that has been declared as a National Park. It was formerly called as ‘Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary’.

 

This park hosts a large number of avifauna during the summers and is considered as one of the best national parks to observe exotic migratory birds and other birds of India. Located in Bharatpur district of Rajasthan, this park serves as a primary centre for ornithologists and other zoological studies.

  1. 8. Periyar National Park, Kerala

 

The Periyar National Park, Kerala is the only national park in South India as well as in India that has an artificial lake flowing through the forests. Located on the evergreen hills of the Western Ghats, this wildlife sanctuary is also one of the Tiger Reserve Forests in India.

 

While boating in the Periyar Lake, visitors can behold the mighty beasts of this park, quenching their thirsts on the lakesides. Elephants, Deer, Nilgiri Tahrs and Langurs are the other attractions of this park.

  1. Pench National Park, Madhya Pradesh

 

 

While visiting the Pench National Park in Madhaya Pradesh, the childhood fantasy of most of the visitors will turns into reality. Rudyard Kipling’s ‘The Jungle Book’ is based on the natural surroundings of this national park; this park is also known as ‘Mowgli Land’.

 

While Tigers are the most dominant species of this park, Leopards, Sloth Bear, Wild Dog, Barking Deer are some of the other attractions. With more than 170 species of birds, this park has also become one of the best places for birdwatchers.

  1. Ranthambore National Park, Rajasthan

 

The Ranthambore National Park, Rajasthan, is one of the royal national parks in India. It is ranked as one of the top 10 wildlife sanctuaries in India.

 

The majestic Tigers are the pride of this national park. Surrounded by the Banas and Chambal River, this park serves as an ideal habitat for the predators and other animals of this park. Leopard, Nilgai, Wild Boar, Sambar and Hyena are some of the major animals found in this park.  Tiger Safaris are immensely popular among the visitors of Ranthambore National Park.

  1. Manas National Park, Assam

 

Considered as one of the youngest names in the list of National Parks in India, the Manas National Park or Manas Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam has a large number of rare and endangered species. Assam Roofed Turtle, Hispid Hare, Golden Langur and Pygmy Hod are some of the most endangered species of this park.

This park boasts of its 55 species of mammals, 380 species of birds and a substantial number of reptiles and amphibians. Asian Elephant, Indian Rhinoceros, Water Buffaloes, Leopard and Assamese Macaques are the other dwellers of this park. It is also one of the popular destinations for river rafting.

  1. Nagarhole National Park, Karnataka

 

Nagarhole National Park is located in Mysore district of Karnataka and is a popular destination for Tiger spotting. It is also known as ‘Rajiv Gandhi National Park’. With quite a large number of Tigers, this park also has a significant number of Indian Bison, Leopard, Sloth Bear and Elephant.

 

Forests of this park are extremely rich with several species of high commercial valued trees. Teak, Sandalwood and Silver Oak are the major trees found in this park. Along with the endangered Mugger Crocodile, this park also has more than 250 species of birds, 96 species of Dung Beetles and 60 species of Ants.

  1. 13. Sunderbans National Park

 

Sunderbans National Park is one of the largest and oldest in India. Located in the deltaic region of India, this park also shares its boundaries with Bangladesh. Covered with mangrove forests, Sundarbans is the original abode of the stunning Royal Bengal Tigers.

 

It has the highest number of Bengal Tigers than any other parks in the world. Salt-Water Crocodile can also be found in this park. Sundarbans is extremely rich in avifauna, aqua fauna and reptiles. Some of the other endangered species in this park are Gangetic Dolphin, River Terrapin, Hawks Bill Turtle and Mangrove Horseshoe Crab.

  1. Sariska National Park, Rajasthan

 

Sariska National Park is located in the Alwar district of Rajasthan. Though it was declared as a Wildlife Reserve in 1955, due to the large number of Tigers within this park, it was later declared as one of the Tiger Reserve Forests in 1978.

 

Sariska National Park was the first national park in the world, which was successfully adapted by the majestic Royal Bengal Tigers as their natural habitat. Leopard, Jungle Cat, Stripped Hyena and Golden Jackal are also found in this national park.

[Check out Jeep Safari Of Sariska National Park]

  1. 15. Dudhwa National Park, Uttar Pradesh

 

The Dudhwa National Park, a part of Dudhwa Tiger Reserve, is situated in Uttar Pradesh. History of this park lies back into 1958, when it was declared as a wildlife sanctuary for Swamp Deer. Later, in 1978, it was declared as a Tiger Reserve due to its large number of tigers.

 

  1. Panna National Park, Madhya Pradesh

 

Panna National Park is one of the best maintained National Parks of India. Declared as a Tiger Reserve Forest of India in 1994, this park suffered a heavy downfall in the number of Tigers due to poaching.

 

Among other animals found in this park, Chital, Chinkara, Sambhar and Sloth Bear are found abundantly in this park. Bar-headed Goose and King Vultures are the most commonly found birds among the 200 species of its avifauna.

  1. Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra

 

Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, a Tiger Reserve in Chandrapur district of Maharashtra is the oldest and the largest National Park in Maharashtra. Bengal Tigers, Leopards, Stripped Hyena and Jungle Cats are some of the commonly found carnivores of this park. Sloth Bears, Gaur, Nilgai and Spotted Deer are the herbivores.

Forests of this park always bear the green colour due to the geographical topography of the park’s location. Axle-wood, a fire-resistant species of trees can be commonly found in this park. Among the other species, Black Plum, Arjun and Palas are dominant.

  1. Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Kerala

 

After the Periyar National Park, Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary is one of the largest wildlife sanctuaries in Kerala. This sanctuary is located on the Western Ghats and shares its border with Tamil Nadu on the Annamalai Hills. Among the 34 species of mammals found in this sanctuary, Panthers, Spotted Deer, Indian Elephant, Tiger and Nilgiri Tahr are the most spectacular.

 

It is also the dwelling of Mugger Crocodiles and more than 240 species of exotic birds. The presence of Thoovanam Waterfalls within the forests has made this sanctuary, one of the popular trekking and camping destinations in Kerala.

  1. The Great Himalayan National Park, Himachal Pradesh

 

The Great Himalayan National Park lies among the lush coniferous forests of and the snow-capped mountain peaks Kullu, Himachal Pradesh. It is one of the high altitude national parks in India. While the location of this park is itself a stunning feature, the emerald meadows in some portions of the park makes it one of the stunning parks in India.

Snow Leopard, Himalayan Brown Bear, Blue Sheep, Musk Deer and Himalayan Thar are the commonly found animals in this park. It also houses 181 species of birds, and many more species of reptiles, annelids, amphibians and insects.

  1. Dandeli Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnataka

 

Dandeli Wildlife Sanctuary is the second largest wildlife sanctuary in Karnataka. Located on the banks of the Kali River, it is one of the highly visited wildlife sanctuaries in India. Black Panther, Flying Squirrel, Tiger, Elephant and Leopard can be easily spotted in this sanctuary.

 

Among the wide range of amphibians, Crocodiles are the major attraction of this sanctuary. It is also an ideal place for river rafting, trekking, Bird watching, Tiger and Crocodile spotting.

  1. Silent Valley National Park, Kerala

Located in the Kundali Hills near to the Western Ghats, the Silent Valley National Park is a very popular wildlife sanctuary in India. Being amidst the Nilgiri, the Nilambur, the Palghat and the Attappadi Reserve Forests, this place renders a mesmeric panorama.

Based at a height of approximately 3600 ft above the water level, this national park is blessed with a variety of flora and fauna. It is an abode to around 150 species of birds, 200 species of butterflies and a 1000 species of blooming plants. The magnificent River Kunthi, flows through this park adding to its beauty and alluring more and more visitors.

One may spot a large number of rare species of birds like the Nilgiri wood-pigeon, Malabar parakeet, grey-headed bulbul, broad-tailed grassbird, rufous babbler, the white-bellied short wing and the great Indian hornbill. This place is also dominated by tigers, leopards, sambar, wild boars and gaur.

  1. Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary, Karnataka

Enveloped by both dry and moist deciduous forests and also semi evergreen forests, the Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary is a must-visit place. This is the right place for travellers to experience and admire the wilderness and the miracles of nature.

It is an extensive habitat for an array of plants and animals. One of the most beloved attractions of this sanctuary is the Bhadra River. It is a hub for the wildlife explorers and photographers. Adventurers must indulge in the wildlife safari at this park and witness the diversity of God’s creations

 

There are a number of animals like bison, gaur, leopard, elephant, tiger, sambar, boar, chital, deer, porcupine and muntjac. The bird kingdom here is also endowed with a variety of species like emerald dove, southern green imperial pigeon, great black woodpecker, malabar parakeet and hill myna. The woods are also a dwelling for the dreadful Indian rock pythons and king cobras.

  1. Rajaji National Park, Uttarakhand

 

Witness approximately 49 species of mammals like the Asian elephants, Bengal tigers, leopards, Himalayan black bear, barking deer, wild boar, goral, Rhesus macaques, yellow throated martin and many more at the Rajaji National Park. Based at the foothills of Himalayas this park is a heaven on earth and one amongst the most stunning wildlife sanctuaries in India.

It encompasses the a diversity of tropical and sub tropical woods like Sal forests,  Riverine forests, scrub forests, grasslands and subtropical pine forests. The exquisiteness of the wilds along with the chilled climate magnetises innumerable travellers and has also made the Rajaji National Park an adored getaway.

There are around 315 species of birds like the great pied hornbills, Himalayan pied kingfishers, pea fowls, woodpeckers, pheasants, barbets, and fire tailed sunbirds and many more. Be in awe of the 60 species of butterflies which come from eight families at the park. The most excellent time to visit this place is during the months of December to March. Also enjoy bird watching and wildlife safaris from November to February.

  1. Bhagwan Mahavir Wildlife Sanctuary, Goa

The Bhagwan Mahavir Wildlife Sanctuary is situated in Mollem, a town in Goa. Located in the midst of the Western Ghats this sanctuary is enveloped by picturesque forests. This is one of those wildlife sanctuaries in India that possesses both historical and geographical significance.

It is a hub for bird watchers as it’s bestowed with diverse flora and fauna. This sanctuary is a cosy home for a number of animals that include the gaur, sambar, leopards, spotted Deer, slender toris, jungle cats, Malayan giant squirrels, pythons and cobras.

There is a Devil’s Canyon Viewpoint from where one can easily admire the wildlife at this park. The perfect time to explore this sanctuary is either early in the morning or late in the evening.

  1. Hemis National Park, Jammu and Kashmir

 

Being situated at an elevation that ranges approximately from 3300 M to 6000 M above the sea level, the Hemis National Park is known as the Hemis High Altitude Wildlife Sanctuary. According to a declaration the Hemis National Park is considered to be the highest park all over the world.

A variety of alpine trees like anemone, gentiana, lloydia and a variety of steppe trees like caragana, artemisia, stachys and ephedra envelope and beautify this park. The sanctuary shelters animals like snow leopards, Ibex, shapu, bharal and many more.

There are about 16 mammalian species and 73 species of birds. An assortment of wildlife is seen at this park which includes around 73 species of birds like the snow cock, chukor, magpie, Himalayan whistling thrush, great grey shrike, red mantled rose finch, etc.

Note: We have included National Parks in this list since there is a fine difference between a wildlife sanctuary and a national park.

World

 

 

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10 of the best animal sanctuaries to visit around the world

 

More ethical than zoos, sanctuaries offer a chance to see animals in more natural and comfortable surroundings. They also make a great stop on a travelling trip and some rescue centres have even been founded by former travellers. Here are ten inspirational not-for-profit animal sanctuaries that promise an educational, interesting and uplifting visit. Many of these centres are also actively seeking volunteers, which might be an option for those looking for a more rewarding travel experience.

Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, Brisbane, Australia

Founded in 1927, the Lone Pine sanctuary, Brisbane is the world’s oldest and largest Koala rescue centre. It’s also one of the very few places where you can hold a koala for a fee. A beautiful natural woodland reserve, the popular sanctuary generously offers a home to other animals including kangaroos, native Australian birds and platypus. You’ll also probably be surprised to see how fast the koalas move when the gum tree leaves are brought out at lunchtime.

Chengdu Moonbear Rescue Centre, China

 

UK ex-pat Jill Robinson MBE  founded the Animals Asia Foundation when she discovered how thousands of Asiatic black bears were being raised in factory farm conditions on Chinese bear bile farms (the bile is sold for use in traditional medicines). After years of tireless campaigning, the rescue centre was established in 2000 following an unprecedented agreement with the Chinese authorities to release 500 farmed bears. The sanctuary is open to the public and visitors travel for miles to see the bears experience freedom after spending decades in tiny crush cages.

Sepilok orangutan sanctuary, Borneo

Only a few travellers leave Borneo without visiting the famous Sepolik Rehabilitation Centre and when seeing photos of the impossibly cute residents it’s easy to see why. The sanctuary was founded in 1964 to rehabilitate orphaned orangutans which were mainly victims of the illegal pet trade and logging industry. The large virgin rainforest reserve is home to around 60 to 80 orangutans and they are trained to survive in the wild again and released as soon as they are ready. Visitors are welcomed to the centre but handling of the animals is strictly forbidden. A good tip is to time your visit around feeding time.

Boon Lott’s Elephant Sanctuary (BLES), Thailand

 

BLES located in Sukhothai, Northern Thailand was founded by English animal lover Katherine Connor after she travelled across Asia. During her time spent volunteering at a Thai elephant hospital she formed a very strong bond with a premature baby elephant. Instead of finishing her travels she decided to stay in Thailand to rescue her new friend from being sold to a notorious animal tourist show. After the elephant sadly passed away Katherine sold her possessions in England and with the help of her now husband (a Thai elephant handler) set up Boon Lott’s Elephant Sanctuary in his memory. All the elephants at Boon Lott have been rescued from abuse or mistreatment and visitors enjoy a chance to interact with the elephants in a peaceful and secluded location. Staying guests are asked to be involved in all aspects of sanctuary life ranging from collecting food from the jungle to repairing pens.

Noah’s Ark, Georgia, USA

 

Noah’s Ark is a unique facility located in the US state of Georgia. It provides a home for abused, unwanted and orphaned children as well as animals. The centre is run entirely on donations and is open to the public. Guests arrive to visit the children and see the collection of over a thousand animals ranging from the very large and exotic to the very small and domesticated. Three of their furry resident’s have also made worldwide news. Baloo the bear, Leo the lion and Shere Khan the tiger have formed an unlikely and unusually strong bond after being rescued in a drug’s raid when they were just 2 months old. The predators (who would be enemies if they were ever to meet in the wild) are housed together and curious visitors travel from all over the US to see their affectionate friendship first hand.

Animal Kingdom, Philippines

 

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The Animal Kingdom Foundation has a centre based in the Philippines which rescues dogs from the meat trade and a pretty gruesome fate. The charity was formed after a month long surveillance by animal advocates Greg S. Quimpo and Veterinarian Samaniego and they now work to fight against the illegal meat trade after realising thousands of dogs in the Philippines get caught up in it every day. They set up a no-profit, no-kill dog shelter dedicated to saving abandoned, neglected, abused and slaughter-bound dogs. They welcome animal loving visitors and the dogs are also available for adoption to good homes.

The Donkey Sanctuary, Devon, UK

 

The Sidmouth donkey sanctuary is an English national treasure and a popular family day out. It was founded by Dr Elisabeth Svendsen MBE when her donkey enthusiasm turned into a full blown rescue centre when she saw some ill treated donkeys at nearby Exeter market. Slade House Farm was purchased to house her fast growing family of four legged friends and since then 12,500 donkeys have passed through the sanctuary’s doors. Admission is free and many people come to see the previously neglected or abused donkey’s living happily in the picturesque Devonshire countryside.

The Vervet Monkey Foundation, South Africa

The Vervet Monkey Foundation in Tzaneen, South Africa is home to nearly 700 orphaned, injured, ex-laboratory or unwanted pet monkeys. The sanctuary (established in 1993) is a 23-hectare rescue, educational and rehabilitation centre as well as being a popular tourist attraction. Volunteers are welcomed from all over the world and accommodation and plenty of Vervet monkey interaction is offered in return for help with everyday activities.

 

Two major animal charities helped fund a sanctuary for ex dancing bears in Agra, North India which is located just a few kilometres north of the famous Taj Mahal. The initiative was such a success that by the end of 2009 many of the dancing bears forced to dance on the streets of India for entertainment had been rescued. After their harsh and often brutal treatment the bears recover in large enclosures complete with freshwater bathing pools, climbing frames and other tools of environmental enrichment. Visitors are welcomed by appointment and guests speak of the enjoyment of seeing the naturally playful bears in their new comfortable surroundings.

          The Best Friends Animal Sanctuary, Utah, USA

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The Best Friends Animal Sanctuary is located in 33,000 acres of exceptionally beautiful Utah landscape. One of America’s best known animal welfare groups, it was founded in the late 1980’s as an alternative to the ‘kill’ shelters in the US. The sanctuary now houses 1,700 displaced, homeless or unwanted domestic animals ranging from dogs to pot-bellied pigs. Best Friends is also very popular with visitors and volunteers who can’t seem to get enough of the great scenery and interaction with its often adorable residents.

 

 

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